London

We landed at Gatwick and then caught the train to West Brompton where we walked 2 blocks to my brother-in-law Gary’s flat.  We didn’t do much except go get some dinner and a couple of groceries from the Co-Op the first day.

The next day we took off to go brewery searching.  I got online to start looking for some close by ones.  I found two that we went to find after we finally got moving.

After riding the underground and buses we finally found Four Thieves.  It is what they call a brew pub here, which means it has the brewery in the pub.  The brewery is very small but impressive.  The brewer brews about every three weeks and also brews at several other brew pubs.  They have what we think is about a five barrel system.  We were given a tour that we enjoyed. The beers we tried were very nice but they don’t bottle, so none to bring home.

 

After that we headed out to find another brewery. After several buses and walking in circles we finally came to the Sam Brook’s brewery at 6:03.  We walked in to go up to the bar and no one was around.  I wandered around and took some photos.  David found a bell that said push for help.  We then found out that it closed at 6:00.  Whoever heard of a bar closing at 6.

 

We then walked by the clock that runs backwards. That is called World’s End Clock.

World’s End is a district of Chelsea, London, lying at the western end of the Kings Road. Once a Victorian slum area, council housing was built here in the 20th century, including the brutalist World’s End estate. The area takes its name from the public house The World’s End, which dates back to at least the 17th century.

In the King’s Road, near Milman Street, is an inn styled “The World’s End.” The old tavern was a noted house of entertainment in the reign of Charles II. The tea-gardens and grounds were extensive, and elegantly fitted up for the reception of company. The house was probably called “The World’s End” on account of its then considerable distance from London, and the bad and dangerous state of the roads and pathways leading to it

It is mentioned in Congreve’s Restoration comedy Love for Love (1695) as a place of questionable reputation to the west of London:
MRS. FORE. I suppose you would not go alone to the World’s End.
MRS. FRAIL. The World’s End! What, do you mean to banter me?
MRS. FORE. Poor innocent! You don’t know that there’s a place called the World’s End? (Act II, Scene IX)

 

DSC_0181 (1)

We then decided to go get something to eat to avoid the rush hours.  I say hours because it is not an hour but hours in London.

Author: olehippies

I am a freelance travel writer and photographer. I love to travel with my loving husband. I like to see how the locals live better than going on tours. I love reading and will be reviewing books for everyone.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.