Beaches, Lighthouses, Rocks and Food!

We left our hotel in Brookings, Oregon at 8:20 and headed to Harris Beach.

Harris Beach was named after the Scottish pioneer George Harris who settled here in the late 1880s to raise sheep and cattle. The park boasts the largest island off the Oregon coast. Bird Island (also called Goat Island) is a National Wildlife Sanctuary and breeding site for such rare birds as the tufted puffin.

Find out more about it here:

http://www.best-beaches.com/us/oregon/oregon-beaches/harris-beach

To see my photos follow the link below.

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Gila Cliff Dwellings

We got up the next morning thinking it won’t take long to run up to the cliff dwellings. It was only 38 miles. People were telling us it would take us 2 hours to get there. We are thinking it can’t be any worse than some of our roads. Even my girlfriend, google maps, said it would take us 2 hours. We just thought yea right and took off.

Well people were right. We left Silver City at 8:30am and arrived at the dwelling at 10:15. Yes it was a very windy road but well worth the trip. We saw some deer along the way and crossed the Continental Divide twice today. Once we were 7080 feet and the other one was at 6375 feet both of which were posted so you know when you cross. We also had our ole hippies with us.

It wasn’t too bad of a walk up to the dwellings. I was a little slow because at spots if was a little steep. I wasn’t the only one taking it slow.

This is what Wikipedia has to say about the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument.

Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument is a U.S. National Monument created to protect Mogollon cliff dwellings in the Gila Wilderness on the headwaters of the Gila River in southwest New Mexico. The 533-acre (2.16 km2) national monument was established by President Theodore Roosevelt through executive proclamation on November 16, 1907.[3] It is located in the extreme southern portion of Catron County. Visitors can access the Monument by traveling northbound from Silver City, New Mexico approximately 37 miles on NM 15.

Considered by archaeologists to be on the northernmost portion of the Mogollon People’s sphere of influence, the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument is home to two prominent ruins sites among a collection of smaller sites located within the Gila Wilderness inside the Gila National Forest. The Monument landscape ranges in elevation from around 5,700 to 7,300 feet above sea level and follows the branches of the Gila River. The terrain around the ruins is rugged and arid, and contains steep-sided canyons cut by shallow spring rivers and mesas and bluffs forested with Ponderosa pine, Gambel’s oak, Douglas fir, New Mexico juniper, pinon pine, and alligator juniper (among others). The area geologic history stems from the Oligocene epoch and volcanic activity that subsequently covered the area with ash. The Monument’s hot springs are remnants of this volcanic history.

The Monument consists of 553 acres (2.24 km2) and contains the remains of a Mimbres Culture community in various locations, two of which are most prominent. The namesake ruins’ developers made use of natural caves to build interlinked dwellings within five cliff alcoves above Cliff Dweller Canyon.[4] The TJ Ruins[5] are located on a bluff overlooking the Gila River.[6] The Mogollon Peoples are believed to have inhabited the region from between 1275 and into the early 14th century, during the Pueblo III Era.

Archaeologists have identified 46 rooms in the five caves on Cliff Dweller Canyon, and believed they were occupied by 10 to 15 families. The “Heart-Bar Site” or the TJ Ruins (named for the former ranch which the mesa takes its name from) located on TJ Mesa are largely un-excavated.[7] It is not known why the community was abandoned.

Hopi oral tradition refers to migrations occurred based cycles calendars, and in response to changing environmental conditions. Other ruins include Javalina House, about 1/3 mile above the main ruin, West Fork Ruin, currently under Highway 15 across from Woody Corral, Three Mile Ruin along the west fork of the Gila River, and middle fork of the Gila River at the 11 room Cosgrove Ruin. Dendrochronology (tree ring dating) determined that the wood used in the dwellings were cut between 1276 and 1287. The region provided for growing, gathering and hunting food.

To visit the namesake dwellings, requires visitors to hike a well-traveled mile (1.6 km) long trail loop with several foot bridges over a stream. The entire walk takes about an hour. The hike begins at an elevation of 5695 Feet (1736 Meters) and ends at 5875 Feet (1790 Meters).

If you are ever in area this is well worth the side trip.

Hope you enjoyed my visit to Gila Cliff Dwellings.

We are off to Tombstone next.

Thanks for stopping by!

Fredricksburg, TX

After we said good-bye to my aunt and cousin in San Antonio we headed to Fredricksburg.

This is what Wikipedia has to say about Fredricksburg.

Fredericksburg was founded in 1846 and named after Prince Frederick of Prussia. Old-time German residents often referred to Fredericksburg as Fritztown, a nickname that is still used in some businesses.[5] The town is also notable as the home of Texas German, a dialect spoken by the first generations of German settlers who initially refused to learn English. Fredericksburg shares many cultural characteristics with New Braunfels, which had been established by Prince Carl of Solms-Braunfels the previous year. Fredericksburg is the birthplace of Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz. It is the sister city of Montabaur, Germany.[6] On October 14, 1970, the Fredericksburg Historic District was added to the National Register of Historic Places in Texas.[7]

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Oldest Deli in Texas and Texas Bucket List

Finally the inspector came to inspect the house. There were no major problems, so we decided to go out to eat to celebrate. I was talking to my sister about the inspection and mentioned to her that we were going out. She suggested a few places that we both remembered.

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Hit the Ground Running

Well I have not been able to blog because when I got to Victoria I had to start pricing stuff for the garage sale and I didn’t have WiFi.

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Chasing Tumbleweed Day 6

I forgot to tell one story last night. We started hearing this noise. I think it is the heater fan. David is checking gauges. It is really getting annoying now. I put a CD in to try to drown out the noise. David finally has had enough, not sure if it is the noise or my griping. Anyway he pulls over and as we are getting to get out of the car, David says look between seats. There is our charger just buzzing away and hot. Thank the Lord it wasn’t our little Outback. She is a good old girl.

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Montana, Wyoming and Colorado Day 5 of Our Road Trip

We got an early start today. We headed out at 7am. We said good bye to Montana at 10:04 as we crossed the border of Wyoming.

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Crazy Life

How is your new year going?  Mine has been a little crazy but I have been getting things done.  I kind of fell off track a few times at the end of the year with all the kids here.  I am now back on track and have accomplished many things.  See what I have done this first month of the year.  Read on if you would like to know Continue reading “Crazy Life”

The Song of Achilles

“At once a scholar’s homage to The Iliad and startlingly original work of art by an incredibly talented new novelist….A book I could not put down.”
—Ann Patchett
“Mary Renault lives again!” declares Emma Donoghue, author of Room, referring to The Song of Achilles, Madeline Miller’s thrilling, profoundly moving, and utterly unique retelling of the legend of Achilles and the Trojan War. A tale of gods, kings, immortal fame, and the human heart, The Song of Achilles is a dazzling literary feat that brilliantly reimagines Homer’s enduring masterwork, The Iliad. An action-packed adventure, an epic love story, a marvelously conceived and executed page-turner, Miller’s monumental debut novel has already earned resounding acclaim from some of contemporary fiction’s brightest lights—and fans of Mary Renault, Bernard Cornwell, Steven Pressfield, and Colleen McCullough’s Masters of Rome series will delight in this unforgettable journey back to ancient Greece in the Age of Heroes.

 

The song of Achillies by Madeline Miller was recommended to me by a blogger that is always reading.  I have to admit I was not to sure of this book when I first got it but I was totally surprised.  This book takes a total different angle on Achilles.  David and I both totally enjoyed this book and I highly recommend it.  It you would like to read it just click on the link below.

If you have read this book let me know what you thought or if you plan to read this book let me know.

Thanks for stopping by!