Camping in Seward, Alaska

We were going to Seward last weekend but it was flooded.  We made it this weekend and I finally got all my photos uploaded.

Friday when we got there it was stormy.

We camped on Resurrection Bay. Continue reading “Camping in Seward, Alaska”

The Wirral

I wanted David to see the little village I lived in and meet my very close friends Anna and William Stead, so off we went to Bebington.DSC_0288

After they picked us up at Bebington train station we headed to their house for a nice drink.

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The boys went to William’s allotment and got some fresh strawberries.  After the drinks we moved to some beer.

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We had a wonderful meal and then off to bed.

The next day we were going to show David the Wirral.  I wanted to show him Port Sunlight. In 1887, Lever Brothers began looking for a new site on which to expand its soap-making business, which was at that time based in Warrington. The company bought 56 acres (23 ha) of flat unused marshy land in Cheshire, south of the River Mersey. It was large enough to allow space for expansion, and had a prime location between the river and a railway line. The site became Port Sunlight, where William Lever built his works and a model village to house his employees. William Lever personally supervised planning the village, and employed nearly thirty different architects. Between 1899 and 1914, 800 houses were built to house a population of 3,500. The garden village had allotments and public buildings including the Lady Lever Art Gallery, a cottage hospital, schools, a concert hall, open air swimming pool, church, and a temperance hotel. Lever introduced welfare schemes, and provided for the education and entertainment of his workforce, encouraging recreation and organizations which promoted art, literature, science or music. It was raining, this was not a surprise because we were in England, while we were there.  We stopped for a little bit but then moved on and planned to come back which we didn’t do.

Not sure why the posts there had crocheted covers. I guess it was to protect you in case you fall after a pint.

 

Then was the whirlwind trip around the Wirral.
Wirral (/ˈwɪrəl/), also known as The Wirral, is a peninsula in northwest England. It is bounded to the west by the River Dee, forming a boundary with Wales, to the east by the River Mersey, and to the north by the Irish Sea.
The roughly rectangular peninsula is about 15 miles (24 km) long and 7 miles (11 km) wide. Historically, Wirral was wholly within Cheshire; in the Domesday Book, its border with the rest of the county was placed at “two arrow falls from Chester city walls.” However, since the passing of the Local Government Act 1972, only the southern third has been in Cheshire, with the rest in the Metropolitan Borough of Wirral in the modern county of Merseyside.

 

We ate lunch at Remember When. It was a very nice tea room and food was good.

 

We headed back to Anna and William’s house.  We walked to the allotment where we pulled weeds and picked currents.

 

When we returned Anna made us a wonderful meal.  David got to eat pheasant for the first time.  We then had an ice cream that Anna topped with the strawberries and currents that we had picked.  We had a nice couple of bottles of wine and had some good laughs.  Anna told us how when she was at the university they had to stand with different sandwich boards to make money.  She actually still had one.

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The next day we had to leave our dear friends to head back to London.  I am so glad that they had a few days to spend with us because they have been running around like a chicken with its head chopped off and its wings flapping. They have been going to Wales, Ansty and Bebington trying to take care of 3 houses.  Luckily, they just got the one in Wales sold.  Now all the work will begin on their one in Antsy which is an old thatched roof house. Thanks again Anna and William for showing us a good time.

 

 

 

Chester

Chester is one of my favorite cities with its city walls, roman remains, medieval buildings and Victorian restorations.  Chester was originally a Roman fort on the River Dee and close to Wales. I could not wait to show the town to David.

We got to Euston station to catch the train to Chester .  We were actually heading to the Wirral where I had lived before with my late husband.  I wanted to introduce David to my dear friends  Anna and William Stead, who we were staying with.

We grabbed some breakfast before we left in the train station where we were joined by a pigeon.

 

We arrived in Chester ready to go do the tourist thing, but wait there was a brewery near by.  Off we went to find it hoping that it was there.  I had in my hand the address and directions.  We headed out and were not sure what we were on because the United Kingdom likes to hide the street signs on the buildings if there even is one.  David saw a taxi stand and headed over there to get directions.  When he came out he said throw those directions away because they are totally wrong.  The Brewhouse & Kitchen was just around the corner.

The Brewhouse & Kitchen is a bit different from your traditional pub. They  brew their own, unique craft beers on-site in there brew-tiful microbrewery! As well as matching every dish on their menu to a style of beer they also love cooking with beer, be sure to keep an eye out for recipes that make use of the beers they brew.  We had a nice meal there also.

 

 

I guess the brewery was more important than the tour of Chester.  We checked the time and noticed we had only a short time before we had to catch the train to Bebington.  We walked a little ways down main street to check out Chester.

 

 

We walked across the Dee to the railway station to catch Mersey Rail to Bebington.

 

No Room in the Inn

To start out I will say I have finally got an internet that I can use.  I have to sit in the lobby but maybe I can catch up a little bit before we are off on the bus again.

After the chorus sang mass at St Peter’s we headed to Montecatini.  We stopped at an autogrill to go to the toilette and grab something to eat.  We were approached and asked if we would mind going to another hotel for the night because the one we were supposed to stay in was overbooked.  We said sure.  Sounded like an adventure to us.

We arrived at the Grand Hotel Nizza where we got off the coach and then grabbed our luggage.  Then we were shuffled into a taxi go about 1/2 mile to the Astoria Hotel. When we stepped out of the taxi the spell of the flowers was like a light perfume.  That night we were so tired being that it was midnight that we did not look around much. We took the tiniest elevator I had ever seen up to our room.  Our room was small but very comfortable with a small balcony.  We opened the windows that over looked the quaint little street and off to sleep we went.

The next morning we got up went down stairs to have breakfast.  We ate in the garden taking in the old and friendly charm of the hotel.  As we ate we took in the wonderful smell of the flowers and saw the lemons on the small lemon trees in pots. After breakfast we walked around the hotel taking in the old charm of it.  We then met the owner who told us that he was the fourth generation and his son was going to take over for him soon.  His wife made beautiful flower arrangements all over the hotel.  I would highly recommend this hotel.

 

 

I haven’t seen one of these phones in a very long time.

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Yes, the green shorts are still with us.

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